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Huckleberry Further Reading

Although western huckleberries are not yet cultivated in fields, the potential for domestication is good. Much work remains, however, in developing effective cultural practices and improved varieties. The recommendations in this publication provide a starting point for experimental plantings. Selecting a growing site with acceptable soil and climatic conditions is very important. Choose plants that originate from a location as similar as possible to your growing site. When considering commercial production, start small. As you develop expertise, you can safely expand your production.

For Further Reading

  • Growing western huckleberries. Bul 821. 1999. Agricultural Publications, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2240. Resources for Idaho, University of Idaho.
  • Special forest products. CIS 952. 1992. Agricultural Publications, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2240. Resources for Idaho, University of Idaho.
  • The ecology & culture of Montana huckleberries: A guide for growers and researchers. Misc. Publication 52. 1992. School of Forestry, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812.

This fact sheet is contributed by Dr. Danny L. Barney. Dr. Barney is a Professor of Horticulture and Extension Horticulturist specializing in small fruit and ornamental crops, and serves as Superintendent of the University of Idaho Sandpoint Research & Extension Center. The University of Idaho provides equal opportunity in education and employment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or status as a Vietnam era veteran, as required by state and federal laws.